Papua New Guinea Culture & Traditions: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea


The Gulf people don’t have many opportunities to participate in sing sing, the traditional Papua New Guinea festivals organised in other provinces. Attending the Gulf Mask Festival is a rare occasion to catch a glimpse of the unique culture of the Gulf Province.


 

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Province

After a bumpy ride and with our 4×4 being stuck in mud a couple of times, a few hours later we are finally in a small village of Toare, the location of the Gulf Mask festival, one of the unique festivals in Papua New Guinea.

Garlands of flowers on our necks, clapping locals all around and speeches in our honour, we feel ourselves as a royal family, kind of Prince William and Kate Middleton paying a visit to a Pacific country.

Those interested in the Melanesian culture must have heard about the famous Hagen Show and Goroka Festival. More fervent admirers of the PNG vibrant and unique culture are familiar with Enga Show, Sepik Crocodile Festival and other Papua New Guinea festivals. However, these festivals attracting a variety of tribes from different regions of Papua New Guinea, don’t usually see the performers from the Gulf Province.

While the Gulf Province isn’t entirely isolated, it’s a remote region. Located on the southern coast of Papua New Guinea, river and sea are the most popular means of transportation in Gulf as the region is barely served by roads. For about half a year, the south-east trade winds make sea so choppy that small boats stay ashore most of the time – sea journey can be treacherous.

The remoteness has contributed to the uniqueness of the Gulf culture making it different from other regions of Papua New Guinea. Although facing the risk of vanishing under the impact of the invasive globalisation as elsewhere in the country, the Gulf culture is still alive. The Gulf Mask Festival. one of the unique Papua New Guinea festivals, is a great opportunity to experience it first-hand.

The Gulf Mask Festival is the initiative of a small group of men, the local enthusiasts caring about preserving the unique culture of their homeland. Their motivation, passion and energy resulted in this truly unique festival, bright in colours.

Becoming friends with one them, Vincent, living a simple village life, we truly admire his enthusiasm and his determination to show his culture to foreign visitors.

Papua New Guinea festivals are always a lively event, bright in colours and full of imagination, and the Gulf Mask Festival is no exception.

Traditional dancing and singing show the Gulf culture at its best. Intricately decorated giant wooden masks, the trademark of the Gulf people, are proudly on display, or rather on the heads of the local men demonstrating their traditional dances. It’s a captivating sight!

The exquisite traditional Gulf masks come in different styles, shapes and colours, typical to their clans and tribes.

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

A group of women, dressed in grass skirts, are graciously swinging their hips to the beats of kundu, traditional drums often used at the Papua New Guinea festivals.

Women dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Women dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Women dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Women dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Women dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Women’s mesmerising dances are followed by a group of young boys and girls, painted in bright orange colours and singing traditional songs that almost send you into a trance.

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Men dancers, with giant and intriguing-looking masks, are performing a special dance.

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Man dancer at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Frightful-looking men are expertly throwing long spears.

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

A group of young girls shortly join the others.

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Female dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Female dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

We are literally hypnotised by the dancers and unable to take our eyes off. Several hours have passed without us noticing it despite the scorching sun.

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Men dancers at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Man dancer at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Gulf Mask Festival, or sing sing, in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

Papua New Guinea festivals: Gulf Mask Festival

The locals don’t miss the festival opportunity to come together to have fun, chew buai, or betel nut, meet friends and, of course, watch the performance. Some cheer up their family or friends, who are performing today. The performance is taken seriously, and the locals are helping meticulously adjust every single detail of the costumes and body paint.

Locals at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

Locals at the Gulf Mask Festival in Papua New Guinea

The blue sea and the appealing sandy beach of Toare village, the venue of the Gulf Mask Festival, only adds to its charms.

The fascinating Gulf Mask Festival is now over but the locals aren’t in a hurry to put away their stunning traditional costumes and masks, and return to their homes. We are invited to see some old traditional Gulf masks and gope boards preciously kept in a specially designated place and learn about the Gulf culture and traditions.

The gope boards are the traditional wooden ritual objects of the Gulf Province. Gope boards vary in sizes but they are traditionally elliptical in shape, carved with abstract patterns and stylized figures and painted with white and red ochre natural paints. Many gope boards depict the ancestral spirits protecting the tribes from evil spirits, sickness, or even death. In Gulf culture, gope boards were traditionally used in raids on other tribes and headhunting expeditions. They were consulted as to which tribe to attack, they were given to warriors for successful conquest and used to display the enemy’s skulls.

Gone are those times when bullroarers were used for communicating over greatly extended distances. Although bullroarers are now replaced by mobile phones, they can still be found in the village’s houses and people are proud to show them to us.

In Gulf culture, the village life is centred around the longhouse, or men’s house, where men keep their weapons, the enemies’ skulls and important ritual and ceremonial objects. Traditionally, in Gulf culture, men sleep in the longhouse and women sleep in a smaller hut outside. However, today this tradition almost died out and the families stay together. The locals are very friendly, and we quickly make friends, who show us around.

We stay overnight with a friendly local family in a typical Gulf house on stilts, right near the beach. In the morning, we are greeted with an impromptu dance. Soon, we find ourselves dressed in the colourful grass skirts dancing to the rhythms of dynamic sounds of music.

Joking in the beginning about the royal visit, we now realise we indeed had a royal welcome by these friendly, warm and kind people. Even though they don’t have much in terms of materialistic possessions, they have much more – they have their remarkable culture that they are determined to preserve.

 

Practical Information

Dates: The Gulf Mask Festival is a one-day event usually held in the beginning of June. The 2017 Gulf Mask Festival will be held on 16 and 17 June. To find more information, you can contact the festival organiser, Vincent Ehari, on + 675 70138410 or by email.

Location: The Gulf Mask Festival is held in the Gulf Province located on the southern coast of Papua New Guinea.

How to get there:

The venue for 2017 had not been confirmed but will either be at Toare or the Kerema District headquarters of Malalaua. Toare village is only a few kilometres away from Kerema, the capital of the Gulf Province, located 300km from Port Moresby (about 4h drive).

Although Kerema can be easily reached by PMVs (Public Motor Vehicles) from Port Moresby, PMVs don’t go to Toare village. But the festival organisers can arrange the short ride to Toare village.

However, the most comfortable, the easiest and the safest option (but more expensive) is to organise the transportation directly to Toare village with the festival organisers. If you prefer to rent a car (prohibitively expensive in PNG) or you are an expatriate with your own car, the security escort can also be arranged by the festival organisers. The security escort means you will be driving in a convoy with another car belonging to some members of the festival committee. At least, this is what we had.

Don’t miss this unique festival, especially if you are an expatriate in Papua New Guinea with your own vehicle.

Where to stay and eat: Toare is a small village located right on the beach. Although there are no guesthouses available, a stay in someone’s house, with the local food provided, can be easily arranged. Staying with a local friendly family will be another highlight of the festival.

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Written by
Errol & Olga

Written by ANYWAYINAWAY

Olga and Errol are the Swiss-Russian couple behind ANYWAYINAWAY. Passionate about unique culture and traditions, they decided to take career breaks and explore the world with the intention to expand awareness and provide new perspectives to the understanding of ethnic minority people, customs, traditions and culture. They also show the beauty of our planet and try to find something interesting in the ordinary.

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